24 HOURS IN GOD’S OWN STATE

After spending two Days in Anambra state , my travel buddies and I moved to Abia State which is officially my 17th state in my journey to visit 25 Nigerian states before turning 25! It took us 3 hours from Onitsha to Umuahia . A heavy rain welcomed us to God’s own state as we tried to make our way in.

The War museum was our first point of visit as we had very limited time in the state. Upon arrival, we were informed that the museum was closing because of the rain at 3pm when it ought to close by 5pm. After much pleading, we were asked to pay a gate fee two hundred naira each and a tour guide was assigned to us.  The War museum showcases the military history of Nigeria with relics from the Biafra-Nigerian civil war. It has a collection of tanks,  ships and aircraft all from Nigeria or Biafra. Almost all tanks are Biafran and all aircraft are Nigerian.  As with The National Museum in Kwara and Lagos, pictures aren’t allowed inside the main gallery.

In the underground bunker situated in the museum we were shown images of the prominent personalities that were involved in  Biafra, the Biafra radio transmitter , office tables and flags which are still very much intact .Outside of the museum are locally fabricated weapons, aircraft and ship that was used during the War. I was impressed that most of these weapons were made by Nigerians during the war. We retired to a nearby hotel as the rain did not allow us continue exploring.

The next morning, we visited the Ojukwu’s Bunker which was originally known as the Subterranean office of the government of Biafra but after the war, it was renamed Ojukwu’s Bunker which was built in 1963 and donated to Biafra in 1968. An entry fee of two hundred Naira is required to visit the Bunker. The compound where the bunker is situated belongs to Dr. Michael Okpara who was one of Ojukwu’s top advisers.  The bunker was a hideout for Ojukwu and his kinsmen during the war to have meetings. It is 30 feet deep and has a living room where meetings were held, a bedroom which was for Ojukwu but he never slept there, a kitchen, a store and a place to keep detained soldiersDo you know about Ojukwu's Bunker in Abia State that was used as a hideout for meetings during Biafra? Find out more here! Click To Tweet

There are two escape routes from the Bunker which our Guide showed us and allowed my group to go through. One would expect that such a  hideout would be hot but it was not as there were holes strategically placed outside to allow air into the Bunker. We took some pictures and departed to Imo state where my travel buddies visited Oguta Lake but I could not as I was down with a fever. I returned back to Lagos after an eventful 4 days in the East and was glad to be able to learn more about the Biafara era.

I kept wondering how things would have been if we had two countries as Nigeria and Biafara. How do you think things would have been? Please share your thoughts with me in the comments section. Thank you for following my journey thus far as this makes it my 17th Nigerian State Visited!

Have you been to Abia state before and to any of the places I visited? What was your experience like? If you have not visited these places, would you like to visit them? I would love to hear from you in the comments section.

LOVE FROM YOUR FAVOURITE AJALA

 

I am Diusor Odiakosa, a Sociologist by qualification who is in a Long-term relationship with Travelling and Exploring! Currently I am on a goal to visit 25 States in my Country; Nigeria before I turn 25! while still exploring other parts of the World.I love beautiful things, places and people.This travel blog is where I share all my stories, photos and experiences from my journey as well as tips and travel informations that I hope you find interesting and handy.Feel free to say hello at : [email protected]

8 Comments

  1. Our favorite travel girl!!!
    Thank for this particular post because they taught me these things in social studies but I don forget 😂

  2. This is your best blog (trip) I’ve read /seen so far. I have a flare for history & im happy you visited this state to give us some interesting sights into the Biafra war

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